How it all began.

From nursing to soy wax candles

Welcome to my blog, lots of you reading this will already know me, some of you won't - and that's ok :) My name is Lesley Andrews and I am the face behind the brand.

Nurse, now candle maker or ‘Chandler’ if you prefer :)

Here I’m going to answer some of your questions that you've asked me about how I created and started Orchard.


Myself and the hubbie @squirehair

How did Orchard Start?

Orchard Candle Co was founded by me, making soy wax candles as an alternative to buying paraffin counterparts. Itwas born out of very real concerns surrounding the impact paraffin candles had on the environment and on my family's health.

I was gifted a very well known and very expensive candle. Following every burn, I was left with a black mark on the walls — so began my extensive research, paraffin vs soy wax, and I was horrified!! (but that's for another blog post)

This kick started my journey to making homemade candles from soy wax.


A very early candle 2015 made in a jelly mould, note the terrible photography :)

When did you create a brand?

Following my research, I began just making candles for my own use, in vessels I picked up in charity shops.

By Christmas 2016 I was making them as gifts for family and friends and by Christmas 2017 I dared to sell my wares at my son's School Christmas fair, that fair was really the catapult of my journey,

I was astounded at how many people loved them and actually bought them.


Original 'Orchard Cheshire' branding

In 2018 I made the bold decision to launch my own website and brand my candles, it was initially called 'Orchard Cheshire' (that's where we lived) and I launched in March 2018.

It was a tough couple of years as I ran this alongside my full time job in the NHS, but it grew faster than I could ever have imagined and stockists jumped onboard that have since proudly stocked my candles.




Orchard Candle Co branding today

Early 2020 saw a rebrand to 'Orchard Candle Co' bizarrely the ‘Cheshire’ restricted its sales,

and I had my most successful year despite covid19.

In April 2021, after 12 months of the pandemic, I eventually left the NHS fulltime and following a move to live by the sea, I opened my very own bricks and mortar shop in St Annes on Sea just as the 2nd lockdown came :)







Have you always been creative?

Probably yes, as with most nurses (dreadful pay) and being a single mum, I always found ways to make and create. From sewing soft furnishings to trawling junk shops for furniture to paint, I've always loved to make, change and recycle.

When I was painting furniture, I was invited (via Twitter) to appear on C4 TV in a programme named 'French Collection' I didn't win, but had the best time, being flown to Nice, France, to shop in the antique markets and then a trip to York to sell my upcycled wares to the traders.

It was a very exhausting but fun experience.



What kind of nurse were you?

I was a nurse for 38 years, I started at the age of 16 as a cadet nurse, and for 20 of those 38 years, I was an ICU nurse.

Working in ICU during the pandemic 2020

Intensive Care Nursing is as it says in the title, intensive, highly skilled and made up of the tightest teams you can ever imagine working with who always have your back.

I was a nurse who can keep you alive on a ventilator whilst you're in a medically induced coma, analyse your blood gasses and tune your ventilation accordingly Manage your kidneys on a hemofilter and make autonomous decisions about the need to off load your system of fluid.

A nurse who can manage your heart on quadruple strength inotropes and interpret your ECG for life threatening changes. A nurse trained in Advanced Life Support and cardioversion (shocking your heart back to a normal rhythm) and part of a team that will continue CPR on someone's chest for as long as is appropriate whilst trying to save your life.

All combined with your activities of daily living care and support for your traumatised relatives and friends.

I'm not going to lie; it took me a while to come to terms with leaving, to leave my work family, to work alone and to be fully responsible for myself and my earning potential.


Was it hard to leave nursing to do this full time?

I think it was just time – the right time for me to go.

At the end of the first year of the Pandemic, I’d had enough.

It was also about creating a life free from the constraints of working in public service.

Freedom from 36 years of weekend shifts, night shifts, Christmas Day shifts, being told I can't attend your party because I have to work.

Freedom to make my own choices about how and when I work.

Freedom to earn as much money as I possibly can because I deserve it, without someone else telling me my worth and undervaluing me.